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FREEDOM CORNER

A PEACEFUL ENGLISH REVOLUTION IS ON THE WAY-ALERT-1

 
RON PAUL 9-11+(1) GLOBALWARMING SCAM USA IRAQ/AFGHAN LONDON BOMBINGS COMMON PURPOSE CONSPIRACY CENTRAL BANKS  +(1)
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2)

Protocols

of

ZION

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OF

LONDON

 

 A STATE WITHIN ENGLAND

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John

Coleman

WHO OWNS

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POWER

OF 1)HAARP FOR GOOD   2)EVIL

Mind Control Henry Makow 1)Chemtrails

2)CREATED

C3)

PRIVATE CENTRAL BANKS

War

is a Racket

     
 

 

AN ENGLAND THAT WOULD NOT BE UNFAMILIAR TO CHARLES DICKENS-BUT PEOPLE WERE HAPPIER.

 

*

 

LOST AGE OF INNOCENCE

by

 

 

Max Arthur

 

*

Daily Mail

Saturday, April 1st-2006

 

 

Can it really be in Living

memory?

A remarkable

new oral history

of

Edwardian England

 

reveals

A country where most people

Led lives of poverty

Unimaginable today…but still seemed happier than we are

 

CHILDREN riddled with disease and forced into workhouses, rat-infested homes and filthy, crime infested streets; these personal accounts of everyday life, conjure up an image of

ENGLAND

 

That would not be unfamiliar with Charles Dickens.

 

In fact, although these chronicles -collected together in a new book -have echoes of an entirely different age, they actually took place only 100 years ago.

 

They are the forgotten voices of the Edwardians-and anyone who believes the old saying that the reign of Edward VII from 1901 to 1910, was supposed to be a golden age is in for a shock.

 

Here is one citizen, Edith Turner remembering her childhood, circa 1905.

 

‘When my brother was three days old my mother had milk fever. That’s when a baby can’t suck the milk from the mother and the milk goes to the brain, where it causes something like meningitis.

 

‘It came from worry, anxiety and unemployment. My mother was unstable. She didn’t know what she was doing. The more the baby cried, the more she smacked him.’

 

The doctor ordered that her mother be taken to hospital:

‘So my mother was taken away with my brother strapped to her side on the stretcher. At the same time, a nurse carried my youngest sister downstairs, because she was found to have double pneumonia. That left the rest of us with father.’

Her father went out selling papers to earn a few coppers. ‘When he was out doing this. I was locked in a room at home so I couldn’t come in contact with the landlord.

 

‘The landlord would knock on the door and when he got no answer he tried to open the door to get in. I used to lie on the floor and watch under the door to see he went away.’

 

EDITH, undernourished, developed ringworm and eczema; her whole head was covered with in sores. ‘My parents were unable to care for me. I was put in Cottage Homes, which was a place similar to Doctor Barnardo’s, where children who they thought were unwanted were cared for until the parents could take then again.’

‘There was NO welfare state then.’

-recalled Anne Taylor.

 

‘The doctor pleased himself whether he came or not…and if you hadn’t got a half a crown (12-and-a-half pence), he wouldn’t come in the house to look at you.’

 

Children had a dose of senna pods or brimstone and treacle each week to keep them healthy. To cure colds, Anne’s father ‘ would rub Russian tallow and he used to rub it on our chests and since our clothes weren’t thick, he ‘d wrap sheets of brown paper round us.

 

‘You could see some of the poor little children - they came out with rickets -with irons on their legs. Or you might be playing with this girl, same age, and see it coming -the signs of consumption.’

 

Don Murray remembered much the same: ‘When I was at school, every class had at least two or three children who were knockneed, bow-legged or humpbacked. There was something wrong with at least three or four in each class.’

 

Children in those days lived constantly in the presence of death and birth. Edward Slattery, born in a Lancashire mill town in December 1891, was the eldest of 13 children, of whom six survived childhood.

 

He watched his twin brother and sister die of the croup -‘Somebody seemed to come and die at our house every year when I was a boy.

 

‘I was 11 when I first learned where babies came from. My mother was preparing to bake our weekly 20ib dough, when she started to scream for me to fetch Mary O’Donnell (the midwife) …

 

‘When the midwife heard my message, she ran to my mother and I followed. My mother lay on some papers spread out on the floor, which seemed to be covered with messy blood, and Mary was pulling a baby from her belly. She told me to go out and play for a while.’

 

The lower middle classes strove to distance themselves from all this, taking refuge in the belief that the poor were feckless and should be left to fend for themselves.

 

Ronald Chamberlain’s father was a clerk in the Post Office, bringing up three children on a modest income of 7 or 8 a week. He always wore a bowler hat and never worked in his shirt sleeves.

 

THERE was great strictness about table manners remembered Chamberlain: ‘No elbows on the table. Don’t put food in your mouth when it is already full. Don’t speak while your eating. We always said grace before a meal, and had to ask permission to leave the table.’

 

‘The clothes he had to wear were equally restrictive: At the age of five or six I had a velvet suit with an elaborate lace collar and I can remember how uncomfortable it was.’

 

Yet the poorer the home, the more inventive were the ways in which Edwardian children enjoyed themselves. Polly Oldham, whose father worked for Blackburn Corporation remembered playing games with old buttons and swinging hoops round her waist.

 

‘We played in the street. The organ-grinder used to come round once a week, and we’d go and dance on the flagstones to the music. The boys used to dance as well.

 

‘Then a rag and bone man used to come round with a peep show. You’d give him rags, then he’d let you look through a little hole, while he was pulling a string to make these dolls dance.

 

At Christmas, Polly helped hang the stocking up, ‘and we’d get a toffee pig, an apple, an orange, a bar of chocolate and a little toy - and you could buy a little doll then for tuppence, with a black head…The boys would get a whistle or a flashlight and a new penny.’

 

For a farthing there were lots of things one could buy,’ recalled her contemporary Florence Warn.

‘There was a strip of toffee called Everlasting, which it was not; a braid of liquorice which broke into strips and we called Wiggle waggle…sweet shrimps, white or pink fondant mice -we girls were a trifle squeamish about eating these.’

 

The Easter procession in London’s East End had a cart with a barrel organ and another cart with a big dancing bear, but the winner was always a yellow cart with yellow flowers from Colman’s mustard.

 

With the children free to roam at will in those days, those who lived in the countryside found their own delights.

 

Rose Bishop recalled roaming far and wide over Salisbury Plain,

‘with no restrictions of any kind and seeing no one but an occasional shepherd. In due season we went in search of pewit (lapwing) eggs to take home for breakfast or filled our baskets with mushrooms.’

 

Joseph Keate, tired after chasing butterflies, would ‘sit on the grass, dig out a square hole, put some twigs across the top and catch grasshoppers-of which there were hundreds.’

 

School started at the age of five. Every child had to go, even if, like Edith Turner, they had no shoes or socks. In Northumbria, John William Dorgan went to the local colliery school instead of the grant maintained Church school, which his parents couldn’t afford.

 

‘On Monday morning, every child in the school had had to pay four pence. That was an enormous

amount of money in those days. Usually I didn’t have it, so I had to walk to the front of the class and put my hand out. [And by golly- it hurt!]

 

‘I received four good straps on the hand. Girls who couldn’t afford the fourpence got the same. About half the class used to get the strap every Monday morning. Because they counldn’t pay.’

 

Free education only arrived in 1905-06.

 

Children thought nothing of walking miles to the schoolhouse. They boys arrived in gangs, a happy gang or a fighting gang.’ Recalled Mr Patten, also from Northumbria.

 

‘You carried your “bait” - bread and dripping, bread and butter and a tin bottle of tea. You gathered in the playground and had great fun until nine-o-clock when the schoolmaster blew a whistle and you ran into your classes’

 

Slates and chalk were used in class and for homework -and it rained on the way to school, and the chalk washed off, it meant the cane. Slates were horrid things thought Mary Allison -‘they used to scrap when you wrote on them.’

 

‘We had to bring in our own rag to clean them, but sometimes we used spit to wipe the writing off.’

 

Nearly all boys’ schools made liberal use of the blackboard pointer and cane.

Teenagers developed a largely innocent curiosity towards members of the opposite sex.

 

Ted Harrison loved the joywheel at the fairs on Hackney Marshes:

 

‘ It was a flat wheel and it spun you round and we used to like it because you could see the girls’ knees and their drawers…bloomers that came just above the knee. They were the latest thing.’

 

Another new thing was fancy garters. Some of the girls were daring -on the bottom of their petticoats they used to wear a little bit of lace that would show under the skirt. That was the enticement, you see. It used to get them a free drink at the pictures or a fish and chip supper.’

Office life was much more stately. There were horse-driven trams and buses, but most people walked to work, wearing a stiff collar, tie, bowler hat, heavy boots and carrying an umbrella.

 

Typewriters were only just coming in and the telephone was a luxury for the very few, so everything was written by hand, including bank ledgers.

 

City streets, mostly cobbled, were cluttered with horses, pulling carts, buses, trams and the two-wheeled hansom cabs, and were filthy with horse manure. Boys collected it in pans and brushes and put in special containers. At night cleaners hosed down the streets.

 

These lives were incalculably different from the Edwardian upper classes, whose food, heating and sanitation were no worse than those of most British people today.

 

Londoners went on outings to watch the wealthy display themselves: to see Mr Leopold Rothschild, a rich, sociable landowner, driving his tandem of Zebras in Hyde Park, or to bow as the aged Queen Victoria drove slowly by.

 

When Lady Charlotte Bonham Carter went out in the evening she took either a four -wheeler or a hansom cab: ‘One’s parlour maid whistled for them. If you wanted the four-wheeler, she whistled once, but if she wanted the hansom cab she gave a double whistle. The hansom cabs were very delightful.

 

Ronald Chamberlain remembered seeing the first motorbus: @It must have been about 1907. Somebody shouted: “Quick! Quick! Quick! Come and look! There’s a bus without a horse!” It was a primitive thing running along in Islington, making an awful lot of stink and noise, but everybody stood up to look.

 

In the same year the police set up the first ‘speed trap’ to catch any motorist, doing more than 20 mph.

Three officers would stand at markers, 100 yards apart along the road. Each would wave a white handkerchief as the car went past, noting the time on their watches.

 

The time would be divided to calculate the speed of the vehicle.

 

Coal provided nearly all of Edwardian Britain’s energy.

 

When George Cole left school at age 14, he signed up at Seaham Colliery in the North East:

‘I left school at teatime, had a drink of tea with my dad, walked up to the colliery, signed on and started work the next morning at ten minutes to five’

 

Miners took bread and dripping down the pits because butter or meat quickly went rancid from the gas. For the same reason, no smoking was allowed; miners chewed tobacco instead. They wore wooden clogs, corduroy trousers and a woollen shirt.

 

‘You took your dinner wrapped up in newspaper and you used that as toilet paper,’ said George. ‘I took jam sandwiches to eat, and a bottle of cold tea, which I kept in a tin box. You didn’t wrap it in a handkerchief because if you put it on a prop on the side, the rats would have it.

 

In the Cotton and Steel Mills, the pressure was unremitting. ‘You had to pay tuppence a week to brew your own tea,’ recalled a cotton weaver. ‘At Christmas, some mills would carry on - there might be a bit of jollity but not a lot. You were just keen to earn your money. They had a holiday on Christmas Day, but we never got paid for holidays.

 

Jack Gearing was an apprentice waterman on the Thames, carrying horse manure from London Streets for farmers to spread on their fields.

 

He had to sign an age-old pledge to:

 

‘faithfully my master serve, his secrets keep, not waste his goods, nor commit fornication, contract matrimony, not play at cards, dice, tables, nor haunt taverns or play-houses or absent myself from my masters service, day or night.’

 

But Edwardian England was still largely rural - a farmer kept two cows on his farm at Notting Hill Gate - and there was always summer work threshing or hop-picking, not to mention poaching.

 

If there was no work, Harry Matthews in Wiltshire went to the workhouse on a Friday afternoon, and if the charity assessors swallowed his story, they gave him tickets to exchange in the local store for bread and cheese.

 

‘If you couldn’t get any work, they used to give you a ton of granite to crack up and put on roads, and they used to pay you 15 bob for it.’

 

OF COURSE, there was no refrigeration, so butchers had to sell their meat at auction before they closed, late at night. Pigs used to scream because they were put in boiling water alive, to make the meat whiter.

 

It was said:

 

‘You can eat all parts of a blinkin’ pig.’ Tripe was popular, so were pease pudding and faggots. Smoked salmon was relatively cheap, so were oysters, and the muffin man came round at 4pm with a huge tray on his head.

 

Other than working in a factories or as shop assistants, most girls who left school went into service, working long hours for a few shillings a week, with a half day off.

 

Ronald Chamberlain’s father in Islington paid five shillings a week out of his earnings as a Post Office clerk to a little girl straight out of school, who would get up at 6.30am, make some porridge, light a fire and then work hard right through the day until she went to bed at 9.30pm.

 

Apart from life at the very bottom of the social heap, the struggle was not so much for money as for status.

 

Ray Head’s father was a policeman ‘and was moving from what you might call the upper labouring class to the lower middle class. The result was that he built his own house in Hounslow. It cost 250 and had a kitchen, dining room, two lounges and three bedrooms but no inside toilet or bathroom.

 

Hardly any working- class houses had bathrooms. In towns people bathed in tubs; in the cities they went to public baths.

 

In May Pawsey’s street, people ‘didn’t have baths in our houses so we all ran down on Friday nights to the Chelsea Town Hall to line up for a bath for tuppence.

 

‘YOU WERE, in a cubicle and they put the hot and cold water in from outside, so you had to be sure the temperature was right before you let the ladies shut the door.’

Women waged a constant battle against children, drunken husbands, coal smog, paraffin grease and dilapidation to keep the house scrubbed and the shirts white.

 

‘And the rats!’ exclaimed Ethel Barlow.

‘You’d be sitting in the house and all of a sudden rats would come out of the fireplace. We never got rid of rats until World War I.

 

‘The Germans dropped a bomb on the donkey stable at the back of us, and we found that the rats had a big tunnel under the earth and made into all the houses. We dug some more and found a big drain hole in our front garden. When we opened it there were thousands of them’

 

Health care was makeshift. Broken arms and legs were set by the doctor on the kitchen table; you had to be in dire straits to be stretchered to hospital. When Emma Mitchel’s mother was ill, she would run to the chemist foe a sixpenny leech.

 

There are voices, which are not heard in this book:

 

The voices of rapists and child molesters, murderers and madmen. But in the inner cities and the rural hinterland their presence must have been felt.

 

Arthur Harding, who himself had been through Borstal, reminds us that ‘there were plenty of child murders and people were afraid to trust their children to other people’.

The notorious Amelia Dyer strangled six children with white tape and was hanged at Reading.

‘On top of that, we were living in the midst of criminals and thieves. I can remember we would always put something against a door -fix the Windsor chair under the lock. That would stop anyone opening the door at night.’

 

There were two classes of girl according to Harding:

 

‘There was the prostitute pure and simple. With her, you take your coat off, hang it up and she’d get ready to go to bed.’

 

The others ‘were girls in Spitalfields who’d give you a ‘fourpenny touch’ - a knee-trembler’.

 

‘All the world is changing at once.’

 

remarked Winston Churchill, but in fact, the real changes would not begin for another four years, with the onset of World War I. It was in the wake of the War that the Edwardian age seemed golden.

 

What emerges from these hundreds of forgotten voices is not change but continuity -the essence of a national character, which survived

 

2 World Wars

 

and survives

 

TODAY

 

* * *

 

[Font altered-bolding & underlining used -comments in brackets]

 

APRIL/06

EXTRACTED

 

by

 

Christopher Hudson

 

from

 

Lost Voices Of The Edwardians

 

by

 

Max Arthur

 

Published by Harper Collins

On Monday April 3-2006 at 20.

 

To order a copy for 16 (plus 1.95p&p) call 0870 161 0870

 

* * *

 

*

 

*

The abolition of Britain
by The Reform Treaty
- Second Reading-Passed by majority of 138

*

Veteran parliamentarian TONY BENN speaks of the absolute necessity of a

REFERENDUM

HEAR HIM ON

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=o0I-ZdvQz1o

*

 

 

 

*

www.noliberties.com

[Latest Addition - June07]

*

www.eutruth.org.uk

*

www.thewestminsternews.co.uk

*

 

www.speakout.co.uk

*

 

Daniel Hannan - Forming an OPPOSITION to the EU

www.telegraph.co.uk.blogs

 

*

 

 

VOTE

MAY -2007

 

TO LEAVE THE EUROPEAN UNION

WITH THE ONLY PARTY WITH A MANDATE

TO SET YOU

 FREE

 

THE

UK INDEPENDENCE PARTY

www.ukip.org

 

TO RECLAIM YOUR DEMOCRACY DON'T VOTE FOR THE TRIPARTITE PARTIES IN WESTMINSTER

BUT

SMALL PARTIES THAT SPEAK THEIR MINDS WITHOUT SPIN AND LIES.

*

 

ONLY

PRO-PORTIONAL REPRESENTATION

WILL BRING DEMOCRACY BACK TO THE ENGLISH PEOPLE

*

Home Rule for Scotland

WHY NOT

HOME RULE for ENGLAND

 

*

MAY/07

 

[All underlined words have a separate bulletin]

 
Elections in the British One Party State

If you vote Conservative, Labour, Lib-Dem, UKIP or the BNP, you'll be voting for the EU dictatorship. All five party leaderships are EU controlled. That's why your vote doesn't make a difference - all these five parties have the same policies: the EU's policies.

The 17 most senior politicians in the Conservative, Lib Dem and Labour parties, including Ken Clarke, Francis Maude, Cameron, William Hague, George Osborne, Nick Clegg, Brown, David and Ed Milliband, Ed Balls, Peter Mandleson are Bilderbergers, the 140 strong band of ultra senior Freemasons who are bribed by the EU to build the EU dictatorship.

No Bilderberger, Freemason or Common Purpose graduate should ever be allowed to hold public office.

UKIP and the BNP are honey traps to neutralise activists: UKIP is riddled with Freemasons and Common Purpose like a cancer, and the BNP controlled by the Edgar Griffin (father) and son Nick Freemasonry family. The 350,000 freemasons and the 40,000 strong Common Purpose Organisation are the (mostly unknowing) foot soldiers of the EU in Britain. (Which makes the BNP the easiest party to clean up - get rid of the Griffins, and put in a real anti-EU leadership.)

 For more details go to :http://eutruth.org.uk

IF YOU ARE A MEMBER OF

UKIP

 OR

 INTEND TO JOIN THEM TAKE NOTE OF THE MESSAGE ABOVE

 

 

THE EDP HAS BEEN CRITICAL OF THE MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP OF THE UKIP FOR SOME TIME NOW AS IS SHOWN IN A NUMBER OF BULLETINS  OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS WHERE WE HAVE CRITICISED THEIR LACK LUSTRE PERFORMANCE AS THEY FAILED TO MOTIVATE THEIR MEMBERSHIP TO A MORE DETERMINED CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE CAMPAIGN WHICH WOULD HAVE MADE THE GOVERNMENTS TREMBLE BUT THEY HAD NO WORRY BECAUSE THEY HAD THEIR OWN PERSONS IN CHARGE AT THE TOP OF THE ORGANISATION.  THIS FIGHTING SPIRIT HAS BEEN LACKING AND WE CAN CONFIRM THIS OURSELVES BECAUSE WE HAVE BEEN OUTSIDE PARLIAMENT WHEN A MARCH WAS CANCELLED - AND WATCH THE FARCE WHEN CANDLES WERE HELD AND THOUSANDS OF LETTERS SENT TO MPS WHO KNEW WHERE TO DISPOSES OF THEM -AND ALL TO NO AVAIL.  IF YOU ARE A MEMBER OF UKIP YOU HAVE BEEN BETRAYED BY YOUR OWN LEADERSHIP SOME APPEAR ON THE ALEX JONES SHOW WHICH HAS BEEN UNDER CLOSE SPOTLIGHT RECENTLY AS BEING CLOSE TO AN ISRAELI SECURITY FIRM DETAILS ON OUR WEBSITE .    IRONICALLY IT WAS A CHANCE LOOK ON THE INTERNET A FEW YEARS AGO  TO COME UPON THAT SITE WHICH OPENED OUR MIND TO THE ILLUMINATI.   THOUGH WE HAVE SOME DETAILS OF THE BILDERBERGERS ON OUR SITE  A NUMBER OF YEARS AGO WE FAILED TO DO MORE RESEARCH- WE ALL HAVE TO LEARN.  THE FAILURE OF UKIP WE HAVE SUSPECTED  FOR MANY YEARS   THAT MANY AT THE TOP OF THEIR ORGANISATION MIGHT BE UNDERCOVER MEMBERS OF THE ILLUMINATI.  IT IS A FAVOURITE TRICK OF THEIRS TO SUPPORT ANY PARTY OR ORGANISATION AT THE OUTSET WHATEVER ITS POLICY AS IT ALLOWS THEM TO PUT THEIR OWN PEOPLE IN TO CONTROL ITS POLICES AS THEY BEHIND THE SCENES SUPPLY THE VITAL FINANCIAL SUPPORT.

  Our intention is not to benefit from this disaster as since the 1999 European Election we have NOT! accepted a DONATION! from ANYONE! and we closed membership also because we did not wish to split the vote for UKIP but have stated in the past that we would contest another election if it was ever necessary to enter into the affray again and with the reputation of UKIP under scrutiny we will keep our options OPEN!   As we mentioned some time ago we have been almost two decades on the campaign trail to free our once FREE INDEPENDENT NATION STATE of ENGLAND from the SATANIC EU and those who have for centuries have planned for an EVIL ONE-WORLD CORPORATION/GOVERNMENT and EXTERMINATE! at least 5 BILLION of the WORLD'S POPULATION and therefore if we are right about those mentioned above they are not only TRAITORS to their COUNTRY but also a THREAT to WORLD PEACE.   However, of late, matters have NOT! been going well for the ILLUMINATI as you will observe BELOW.

 

WHAT A WAY TO WIN A WAR

 

 

BENJAMIN FULFORD

 

More!

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THIS YOU MUST SEE IT CONCERNS

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AND

 YOU!

 

 

NO NEED TO PANIC!

 

'Others shall sing the song,

Others shall right the wrong,-

Finish what I begin,

All all I fail of win.

Hail to the coming singers!

Hail to the brave light-bringers!

Forward I reach and above

All that they sing and dare.

 

The airs of heaven blow o'er me;

A glory shines before me

Of what mankind shall be'-

Pure, generous, brave and free,

I feel the earth move sunward,

I join the great march onward,

And  take, by faith, while living,

My freehold of thanksgiving.-

 

WHITTIER

 

MAY-2012

 

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