MAJOR ISSUES BULLETIN
 
     

WE HAVE A QUESTION YOU MIGHT LIKE TO ASK MA'AM! -WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO OUR FREEDOM- CONSTITUTION AND COUNTRY?

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The Queen has missed her vocation. She'd be wonderful as a polite Paxman asking the questions we ALL want the answers to.

by

TOM UTLEY

[Daily Mail-Friday,November 7 ,2008.

[EXTRACT]

AT THE AGE of 82, the Queen broke the habit of a lifetime on small-talk this week when she turned up for the official opening of the 71 million New Academic Building at the London School of Economics.

Shown round by Professor Luis Garicano Heead of Research at the LSE's Management Department, she didn't ask him:

Have you come far?' Nor did she want to know: 'have you been working here long?'

INSTEAD, Her Majesty put into words the question that has been puzzling all 129 million of HER SUBJECTS in BRITAIN and around the world for many months -the very thing that YOU and I might wish to ask a PROFESSOR of ECONOMICS if we happened  to bump  into one on a BUS,

What she wanted to know was THIS:

since the scale of the credit crisis is so enormous, why on earth didn't anybody SEE IT COMING?

I can't help feeling a stab of sympathy for Professor Garicano. there he stood, in his Sunday best, all primed to tell the QUEEN:

'No ma'am, I haven't had very far to come today.' (Or, as the case may be: 'Yes ma'am I've had a fairly long journey.')

YET HERE she was asking him the $3 trillion question THAT WE ALL WANT ANSWERED:

'WHY have bankers, politicians and economists TURNED OUT TO BE USELESS AT THEIR JOBS?'

The professor's answer seems thoroughly inadequate to me. According to his account, he told the QUEEN:

'at every state, someone was relying on somebody else and everybody thought they were doing the right thing,'

A more illuminating reply might have been: Bankers didn't see it coming, ma'am, because they were so busy dreaming about theier whopping bonuses that they couldn't THINK OF ANYTHING ELSE.'. . .

The list of questions that the Queen could ask our politicians is almost endless.

With her interest in economics, she might start by asking the Prime Minister:

'If we got into into this mess by spending and borrowing TOO MUCH, why do you suppose that we'll GET OUT OF IT by SPENDING and BORROWING MORE?.'. . .

When she has finished grilling the Prime Minister, her majesty might turn her attention to Ed Balls, HER Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families....

While she's at , the Queen might like to ask him: 'Tell me , Mr Balls, why are exam questions so easy these days?'...

In fact, couldn't she ask all three party leaders the next time she gets them together at a STATE BANQUET

'Can anyone please explain the difference between Labour, the Tories and Libdems?'

That should be far more interesting. I'm sure SHE'D AGREE, than the answer:

'Have you come far?'

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NOVEMBER-2008